Vaccinations Explained

Vaccinating your pet is the only way to ensure they are safe from the most common infectious diseases and the most effective way of keeping these diseases under control.  

People often say, “I’ve never heard of a dog with Parvo Virus so what’s the point in vaccinating against it?” The reason fatalities are so few and far between is because of the excellent vaccination protocol we have in the UK.

Dogs – In the UK dogs are routinely vaccinated against Canine Distemper, Canine Hepatitis, Canine Parvo Virus, Canine Parainfluenza Virus and Leptospirosis. This vaccine should be given from 8 weeks old. A booster of that vaccine will be given 2 weeks later, and some dogs will also need a 3rd vaccination a few weeks after that. It is not safe to walk your puppy in public places until approximately 2 weeks after the second injection, but your vet will keep you right about the exact timings. A booster vaccine will be given every year.

Cats – In the UK cats are routinely vaccinated against Cat Flu, Feline Infectious Enteritis and Feline Leukaemia Virus. The vaccination protocol for kittens is 9 weeks old for the first one followed by a booster of this 3 weeks later and then yearly after that. Even indoor kittens and cats should be vaccinated as there are several ways for these potentially fatal diseases to be spread. 

When you take your pet to the clinic for a vaccination the vet will carry out a nose to tail health check. They are looking out for anything irregular or new and will ask you many questions about how they are at home.  The vet will look in your pets ears, eyes, mouth and listen to your pets chest using a stethoscope. They will feel their abdomen and will want to know all about their toilet habits!  By taking your pet every year you are allowing early warning signs of issues to be detected and treated before they can become much worse. As pets get older it’s a really good idea to take them at least twice a year for a check-up like this.